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Rookie 11-14-2010 04:34 PM

slug question
 
Can you shoot non-sabot slugs through a rifled barrel without worrying about damaging the rifling on the barrel? Someone told me it would wear out the barrel but I canít find anything on the web to back that up.

Tubes77 11-14-2010 05:23 PM

Can you shoot a rifle bullet through a rifled barrel?
Same concept. The soft lead of the slug is not going to affect the rifling any time soon. I mean, in several thousand shots you might see some where, but we'll both be long dead by then :lol: Of course you can shoot a non-saobted slug through a fully rifled barrel, but why would you want to? Accuracy is going to be extremely poor, and in fact, bullets may tumble on you from what I've read as they become unstable (not sure why, just remember reading that somewhere).

I've shot non-rifled slugs through my gun to "get on paper" but the reason for a fully rifled barrel is to take advantage of the great slugs on the market.

Is the reasoning to save money? If so, my guess is that even the cheapest saboted slug you can buy will pattern better than the foster type slugs.

walleyenut 11-15-2010 05:44 PM

Sabot slugs are made for rifled barrels. Using regular slugs and rifled slugs over time will deposit lead in the rifling grooves inside the barrel gradually hurting your accuracy. Using the sabot slugs greatly improves accuracy making it possible to shoot accurately at 100 yards. It makes your shotgun into a rifle in a way.
But, as Tubes said, we'll all be long gone by then.

neontetra 11-15-2010 08:00 PM

slugs
 
I just shot my slug gun at the Aurora Sportsman's Club. I shot sabots and sluggers through my rifled barrel at 50 yds. I got 1" groups with sabots and 2" groups with sluggers. This was a rem 870 express, cantilever scope mount barrel, and bushnell holosight.

huntnfish79 11-16-2010 10:54 AM

I would think the lead would gum up the rifling wouldn't it?

I just put that holosight on my 12 ga this year. pretty cool little gadget.

I also just bought a lazer boresighter, man what a difference that makes. No more 3 boxes of sabot to sight in a new scope. Three shots and done.

Rookie 11-16-2010 04:20 PM

I was looking to do some early sighting..."get on paper" as Tom said and was told not to shoot those.

Since I'm rather new at everything I do with hunting, I figured I would use the cheaper bullets as I figured out how to adjust my scope etc.

Sounds like I can more than get away with a few rounds.

mrmoc 11-17-2010 12:12 AM

But those slug rounds are not going to tell you much about the sabots. You would be better off going to Cabela's or some place where they will laser boresight the gun/scope for you. Then if you have a sled or some bags you can sight in the gun with 3-5 shots. [/quote]

Tubes77 11-17-2010 09:52 AM

Quote:

I just shot my slug gun at the Aurora Sportsman's Club. I shot sabots and sluggers through my rifled barrel at 50 yds. I got 1" groups with sabots and 2" groups with sluggers. This was a rem 870 express, cantilever scope mount barrel, and bushnell holosight.
That doesn't sound too bad, and as long as you are limiting yourself to 50 yd shots, you'd be OK, but that may not be acceptable at 100 yds. If your groups are twice as big as they are at 50 yds, you will probably be as big or bigger at 100 yds. So if the gun groups sabots 3-4" at 100 yds, you may see 6-8" or worse groups with the non-sabots, which can mean misses you otherwise might not have had. Of course, it's all conjecture without actually shooting the gun at 100 yds, but the point is.. Why not have the most accurate gun you can possibly have when going afield, as long as it's within your financial means? If you already have a fully rifled barrel, is the cost between those slugs really worth the chance at missing, or worse yet, wounding a deer?

To save money, you can theoretically sight in a gun using a single shot, but it takes a steady rest (like the Caldwell Lead Sled or similar) and a friend to help you out. Here's how it goes.

First, remove the scope cap covers and then get your gun firmly in the rest, adjust until it's centered on the bullseye of the target and shoot one shot. Now without moving the gun or yourself from the sight picuture, have a friend turn the adjustments on the scope so that the crosshairs move until they are centered on the bullet hole that you just made.

For example, lets say your shot is high and to the right, which means that on the scope, you will have to move the dials in the direction indicating LOW and LEFT. With the crosshairs still centered on the bullseye, have him move the elevation dial until you see the crosshair move up and pass horizontally through the bullet hole you just made. Now, again keeping the veritcal cross hair on the bullseye, have him adjust the scope until you see the cross hair move to the right and line up vertically with the bullet hole. At this point, without having moved the gun at all, the scope crosshairs should be directly centered on the bullethole, not the bullseye.

Now reload and shoot again. Theortically, it should be directly in the bullseye, but the reality is that you will probably very close, but maybe off a bit. Unfortunately guns do not shoot in EXACTLY the same spot every time, so there will be some variance, depending on the overall accuracy of the gun. What I would do at this point is shoot twice more to develope a "group", then adjust from there.

I actually will shoot a 3 shot group, make a mental note of the center of that group, and then have a partner adjust the scope until it's in the center of this new group. At that point, you probably are not going to get any better than that, as all guns have a little variance (also known as group size). I would then shoot one last time at the bullseye to double check your last adjustment and you should be pretty darned close to the bull. Total shells shot, 5. Not that bad!

If you are shooting good sabots and have a rifled slug barrel, you should be in the neighborhood of about 2" at 100 yds.

wALLDADY 11-17-2010 09:17 PM

Tubes , I understand completely , your post . BUT isnt that backwards ?? If your are holding on the Bullseye , and shoot high right , move scope down and left and hold bullseye and fire again . THAT has ALWAYS worked for me . Its different than sighting bow sights .

a Lead Sled type rest is awsome for saving ammo .


Good Luck and Safe trips ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, Walldady

mrmoc 11-18-2010 12:07 AM

Tubes,
I thought this was an excellent and enightening explanation of sighting in. Provided you are already on the paper, which is where the laser boresighting puts you.

I noted your move of the sights opposite to the hole. Which I think is correct. Walldaddy...It depends on which part of your sight tandem is fixed. With a bow the rear sight (string) is generally fixed and you adjust the front sight. Therefore you move it in the direction of the hole to correct. With a firearm the front sight is fixed and the rear adjustable. So you move the rear sight in the opposite direction to correct.


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