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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
:)5 thinkin aboput goin out mon how about a report? crappie?
 

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I don't know how crappie are doing.But I've been on Ponderosa a couple of times in the past week and beside the two largemouth I caught I keep catching little muskies.Is anyone else catching these little buggers out there?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I get those early every year,pickerle is what i call them their in all the lakes south or north.
 

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There is some debate about this. I have found pickerel to be somewhat rare in
Mazonia, but have caught a few in the north unit. Northerns have been stocked by the State. Previous sportmens clubs have stocked both northern and some muskies. Are people catching young pickerel, northern, or muskies? This is where reports from fishermen of fish markings is important.

Here's some information about the pickerel.

The pickerel is the samllest member of the "pike" family, and grows to a mature adult length of approximately 24 inches, and is often mistaken for juvenile northern pike or muskellunge.

Esox Niger – Chain Pickerel

Esox and niger are both Latin words. Esox means "pike," and niger means "dark," or "black." Like its close relatives, northern pike and muskellunge, the chain pickerel is equipped with a large mouth, well adapted for piscivory. The lower jaw, which extends further forward than the upper jaw, is equipped with four sensory pores on the underside. The dorsal and anal fins are set well back on the body. Chain pickerel are usually olive-green or yellowish-brown on the back and sides, shading to a creamy yellow underneath. There is a distinctive pattern of interlocking dark bands on the back and sides that is reminiscent of a chain-link fence.

INTERESTING FACTS:

Chain pickerel are generally distributed throughout the eastern United States and southern and eastern Canada in quiet, weedy waters. Chain pickerel are one of the first fishes to spawn after ice-out in the spring.
No nest is prepared, and the adhesive eggs drop to the bottom to cling to whatever they happen to fall upon. Young pickerel hatch after an incubation period of one or two weeks, depending on the temperature. The pickerel has earned a well-deserved reputation as predaceous and habitually feeds on other fish. Adults lie in wait of their prey and capture it in one quick lunge. Favorite foods of the pickerel are yellow perch, white perch, and minnows. Pickerel are also known to feed on frogs, snakes, ducklings, mice and muskrats.


<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: MazoniaMan on 2002-03-19 09:21 ]</font>
 

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Fish identification within the pike family can be difficult with juvenile fish. I agree with MazoniaMan, identification is paramount. Not to be a wise guy, but pictures can help in this matter due to the fact that the additional observation of other anglers just gives us all the more information in the assessment process. Regardless of what the fish was, keep having fun. If you do get a picture, post it. This might help you figure out just what specific fish you caught.
 
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