ChicagoLand Fishing Forums banner
1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
59 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
well i was hoping someone could change my life around here i live in henry illnoise, right next to the river and im 22 been fishing since i was 8 and still never learned or fished for these i have ate them and they are increditbly and was wondering if someone could teach me the ropes.were could i catch them, what to use, someone to take me .
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
356 Posts
The easiest way would be to buy some minnows and go to the river and toss one out under a bobber. You'll catch many things this way but eventually you'll get a walleye.

Another good tactic is to get 1/16 - 1/8 ounce jigheads and tip them with berkley gulp minnows. When on the river look for current breaks and slack water and cast the jig into it. Once you've done that either slowly jig it back to you or drag it on the bottom.

This should get you started.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
59 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
thanks star im all ichy now im gonna try this great tactic this weekend and let you no how it works out. I can taste them in my mouth. lol
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
356 Posts
No problem, definately let me know how ya did.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
450 Posts
foodfishing2 ain't caught no walleye yet ...



i use 1/32 orange or pink jigs and a big minnow along the bottom.
on tough days i use a tri-swivel with two 1/64 jigs with a minnow or worm.

look for the fast water near rocks, odds are they're ambushing their prey from there.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
59 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
thanks 1 knot 2 go i will give this one a try also. have any of you guys fished near henry on the river /
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
255 Posts
About 100 driving miles from the IL border there is heideki lake wich is just full of them. I went there thursday with the wind and rain but not even one hit. I've heard people say it's still too cold but it has been dead. Now this time of year I fish the north west or southwest side of the bridge due to the 9ft drop off. Last year we would use only a worm and a hook on the bottom and had alot of fish all under 20 inches. Blade baits was the best for me last year ran along the bottom. I am trying there again today. My first walleye last year was 10 inches and I was happy just to see the fish. I only get to see them ehwn I go on fishing trips up north and it's been three long years. If you are interested in making the drive down watch the reports on cooling lakes section. If you're die hard for a walleye this would be a good last resort if it's a long drive. I drive 46 miles 3 days a week april through the end of may just for these fish. If you can cast far and have a long rod bring that with also and put 1/3 of a big shad or half a bluegill on the bottom and see how amazing the 5-8lb stripers fight. There is a bait shop on the road you get off I55 and just over the tracks they have cut shad if interested. Good luck!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
414 Posts
My advice....pick one style of fishing and learn it to the best of your ability. Some walleye guys like jigging more, some slip bobbers, some live bait rigging (lindy, roach, or wolf rigs)..others crankbaits, and still others prefer to troll.

I prefer slip bobbers and jigs. That is just how I was taught. I am currently learning live bait rigging...gonna try it up north next month.

Walleye fishing is not as difficult as you might think. Just remember some key points...

1. They like hard bottoms. Rock, gravel, sand, etc. If they have access to food and deep water, you will usually find the fish. You will seldom, if ever find them over muck. Exception would be a bug hatch, but that is about it.

2. Fish on cloudy days, or low-light periods. If you got a decent chop on the water, you will be good to go as well. Avoid days that are extremely bright. It isn't that the fish won't bite, because they will...but finding them is a bit tougher.
For some reason, this doesn't apply to river fish....no idea why. I have caught fish on the K3 and Fox with no clouds in the sky and the sun directly overhead....weird how it works, but it does. Darker water maybe?

3. Take baby steps...if you try everything at once, you will get frustrated and give up. Walleye fishing is tough at first, but will become fun as hell, but you got to keep at it, and learn a system, and go with it.

Good luck!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
85 Posts
I agree w/ walleyebrad...There are many styles to catching the eyes, I first learned how to jig and now I'm into trolling for them. troll either a Rapala Shad Rap 5 in the spring 7 in the Fall or I use a worm or leach on a crawler rig for the eyes.

I find that I catch a lot more trolling than jigging or casting....The exception is when I fish K3 or sometimes the Snatch on the IL.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,325 Posts
WalleyeBrad said:
1. They like hard bottoms. Rock, gravel, sand, etc. If they have access to food and deep water, you will usually find the fish. You will seldom, if ever find them over muck. Exception would be a bug hatch, but that is about it.

I thought Mudflats were supposed to be key areas to focus on. Now im not MUCH of a walleye fisherman, but I thought particularly on bigger bodies of water baitfish school on the big mudflats which = walleye.

(Thats how a lot of the guys were fishing when ive been up on Lake Mille Lacs in MN.) I mean, we gave it a try and caught eyes drifting bait rigs and jigging over the mudflats with everybody else, but also caught a bunch of eyes (big ones too) casting for smallies all week.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,655 Posts
Just recently got back from Erie,used a worm about a foot under a sinker,small spinner above that...reel,let drop,reel give a small tug.If you miss a hit..let it drop,wait a second or two and reel again..you will get a second try ;) In the future though I will go to a plastic worm,I do believe,My understanding is they prefer hard,gravel bottom...Good luck to ya,they are some great fighters. :)2
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top