ChicagoLand Fishing Forums banner

1 - 20 of 20 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
32 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
do any of you guys build your own rods?

i have been wanting to get into this craft for a while, but i know nothing about. i recently bought a new baitcasting reel (bass pros reel sale :) ) and now have a need for a new rod. Figured, hey why not build one.

so what tools and or assecories do i need to get to make rods? what kind of end caps and reel seats are good? where is the best place to buy supplies?

any help is appreciated.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
375 Posts
Call Corens in Chicago off of Nina Ave. Eric and Bill will walk you though each step and have all the supplie you need. Good group of guys. If you are looking to save money by building your own rods...not a great idea. $120 in supplies will get you started and the componants of the rod can range from $50 on up. Good luck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
315 Posts
Scout said:
Call Corens in Chicago off of Nina Ave. Eric and Bill will walk you though each step and have all the supplie you need. Good group of guys. If you are looking to save money by building your own rods...not a great idea. $120 in supplies will get you started and the componants of the rod can range from $50 on up. Good luck.
Right you are! Coren's is a great resource!

As far as what you need tool wise it will depend on a couple things, like if you're going to turn your own grip. I've built a few(maybe 5 or 6) and making the grip to me is the best part. I glue up rings on a piece of threaded rod(covered with teflon tape) and turn them down to shape on a drill press, I did my first one on a cordless drill.

Here are the absolute basics:

-blank
-guides(and tip top)
-reel seat
-grip
-thread
-new razor blades
-masking tape
-file, sandpaper, Dremel, or ideally a bench style belt sander for prepping guides
-5 minute epoxy for grip and reel seat
-Flexcoat finish epoxy to cover wraps
-tip top glue, this is worth the money
-alcohol lamp(this will make life easier for attaching the tip top and popping rod finish air bubbles)
-a cardboard box(to use as a rod wrapper)
-a cup to hold the thread while you wrap and a book to add tension
-a white china marker to mark the spine of the blank
-a pack of cheapo small paint brushes(like for water colors or model building, check a dollar store)

*optional but recommended is an electric motor to turn the rod while it's drying
like this http://cgi.ebay.com/ROD-BUILDING-40...ryZ62147QQssPageNameZWDVWQQrdZ1QQcmdZViewItem

there are loads of options about how fast those should turn but that one would do fine.

End caps can be made of lots of thngs, my most recent build is a G.Loomis crankbait rod and I capped it with a 100 yen coin. Sort of a joke since there's so much "Made in the USA" verbage with G.Loomis products(and I'm half Japanese so it's appropriate).


I don't recommend going expensive on the first build, maybe score a cheap kit from Cabelas or something, they have a b-casting kit for under $60

http://www.cabelas.com/cabelas/en/t...&parentType=index&indexId=cat20364&hasJS=true
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
Look up TOM Coony at rod craft components he is a custom rod builder and puts on beginner classes. I took one of his classes many years ago and still fish with the rods i made in class. Tom does beautiful work. I will update post later if I can find contact information. you may want to try googling him.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
263 Posts
rodbuilding

Cabela's has rod kits that's how I got started . Used a fly tying bobin for the thread and made a wood support for the rod. Peice of cake! For drying use an old rotiseire motor to turn it while drying. Have fun :)6 :p I made three fly rods this way. And I have made many repairs too (guides ,etc.)
Enjoy! it's addicting!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
36 Posts
I just finished making my first custom rod. Its a medium heavy 2 piece pacific bay 6 foot casting rod. Should work good for throwing spoons on the big pond for browns.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,974 Posts
Thank God those wraps aren't green and gold. :-D Looks good
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
36 Posts
Thanks , I can't wait to catch something on it as soon as my broken leg is better !
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
105 Posts
I have built a number of rods and I don't have any expensive building equipment. Most stuff like thread tensioners and blank turners can be easily made .
A thread tensioner is just a base which hold your thread at the desired tension so the wraps are as tight as needed. Wooden base with a long enough threaded bolt and a spring in line to be tensioned by a wing nut.
Blank turning motors can be found at Science and Surplus for $2 that turn at a perfect rate of 30 turns per minute. Rollers can be found there also to support the non-motorized end.
An alcohol lamp to apply the tip tops, but more importantly be used when applying the Flex Coat.
There are good Fuji kits for handles that come with reel seat bushings so turning a handle is not needed, although it makes the rod more customized.

I do not ever suggest 5 minute epoxy for anything that flexes and is meant to be permanent .

Once you research enough and have faith in mixing Flex Coat it takes exactly the same amount of time to build a $100 rod as it does a $400. The parts to build a premium rod (minus the blank) with a nice Fuji handle kit and say Fuji Alconite guides is around $75 in parts. You may be able to save $30 and buy cheap parts, but why?

I start with the handle. If I'm layering and turning the cork it's a much longer process than a kit and requires more tools such as the stack compressor and a lathe -type powered tool. Lathes are obviously most precise.
The handle needs to be oriented correctly with the spine and is just a process of lining up the sections and bushings and expoxying them in place. I use Flex Coat for this because I know it will flex with the handle and not be prone to cracking as some expoxies are ( especially 5 minute epoxy) . Some kits come with winding checks and butt caps and most can be customized to your liking.

Once the handle has been expoxied in place and has fully cured the guides can be wrapped on the rod.
You need a guide layout to know where your guides belong on the blank you choose.
The guides are oriented with the spine, which will be marked.
Depending on how many feet and how large or small there are a number of ways to apply the guide to the blank while wrapping it. I usually use a small piece of blue painter's masking tape so no residue is left behind.
The wraps can be as fancy as you like. The main thing you need to know is how to hide the thread ends. There are a few ways to hide threads. Most any building site will have simple hides illustrated.
Once you have all your wraps in place you need to either epoxy the wraps permanently or use another product which is not an epoxy but still a wrap finisher.
If you chose epoxy you will need the alcohol lamp and and a rod turner to ensure even epoxy application.
Flex Coat is a very good product. To mix Flex Coat use a small disposable deli cup and cheap brushes. Cheap, but not so cheap that they bleed hair . These brushes will be destroyed , so buy good enough to get the job done, but not to the point you are worried that you have left hair or bristle behind.
The two parts of Flex are mixed together for at least two minutes. You will visually notice the mix go from opaque at the beginning to clear at just before the two minute mark.
The rod is placed in the turner and the alcohol lamp fired up.
With the lamp at an area directly under the wrap being epoxied the heat should be just enough to make the expoxied move very fluidly. You want enough epoxy on the wraps to fully cover the threads , but not be globby or overy full. As the rod turns and the epoxy is applied with the brush the epoxy will warm and spread. As the expoxy spreads (and can be helped to spread with a brush) . excess is evident and simply removed with an epoxy free brush.
Once the Flex Coat is fully cured the rod is ready to be fished.


My list of parts and such;

Razor blades
Brushes
Rod turner
Thread tensioner
Thread
Epoxy, my preference is Flex Coat
Handle supplies ( cork rings, epoxy, reel seat, bushings, winding check, lathe or other turner, cork tensioner) or handle kit.
Guides and tip top
Tape
90% alcohol
Alcohol lamp
Rags
Stirs and deli cups


I'm quite sure there are things I have forgotten , but those are the basics I use.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
105 Posts
...oh, I also would say Eric at Corens is the go-to guy on building and owning a brick and mortor and is an expert.
I buy from him all the time and also do my on-line ordering from Janns Netcraft.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
480 Posts
Thanks Rich. Can we get that moved over to the help topics forum? Great post.

The guy I know who builds a lot in FL uses MudHole as his tackle supply. Just another option.

-DJM
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
105 Posts
Yup, Mudhole is another place that carries all the parts. Heard good things.
I have used Janns for over a decade and the one single time they messed up a little bit of my order the manager jumped through all sorts hoops to make up for the honest mistake and then jumped back through them on his way out as he was apologetic the whole way.
Good customer service is key. Stellar service has a customer for life, and I'll gladly pay more for it, if needed.
 
1 - 20 of 20 Posts
Top